Antarctic Hydrothermal Vents

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Location: East Scotia Ridge, Southern Ocean

Date: December 2012

Ship: RRS James Cook

A 25-day research expedition to hydrothermal vent fields and other chemosynthetic habitats discovered between 1400-2700m depth on the East Scotia Ridge in 2010 as part of the ChEsSO consortium. The cruise focused on exploring the world’s most southerly hydrothermal vent fields and a natural whale fall using a CTD and the ROV Isis. The wildlife seen on this cruise, both above and below the water, was fantastic!

Below is a video on the hydrothermal vents on the East Scotia Ridge compiled by Dr. Jon Copley:

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RRS James Cook next to the R/V Laurence Gould in Punta Arenas, Chile. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

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My room on the RRS James Cook. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

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ROV Isis being deployed. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

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Stalked barnacles and anemones at the top of a hydrothermal-vent chimney. Photo credit: NERC.

Hydrothermal vents on the East Scotia Ridge. Photo credit: NERC.

Hydrothermal vents on the East Scotia Ridge. Photo credit: NERC.

Wandering albatross. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

Wandering albatross. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

Chinstrap penguins. Photo credit: Diva Amon

Chinstrap penguins. Photo credit: Diva Amon

Kiwa tyleri at East Scotia Ridge vents. Photo credit: NERC.

Kiwa tyleri (Hoff crabs) at East Scotia Ridge vents. Photo credit: NERC.

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Dr. Helena Wiklund and I about to do a Nature Live with the Natural History Museum in London. Photo credit: Dr. Chong Chen.

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Professor Paul Tyler retrieving a Kiwa crab from the biobox on ROV Isis. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

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Specimens of Kiwa tyleri  from the East Scotia Ridge vents. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

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Minke whale skull found in 2010 at this site. Photo credit: NERC.

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Minke whale vertebra discovered in 2010 at this site. Photo credit: NERC.

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Not all smooth sailing on this trip. Rough seas in the Southern Ocean. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

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The bone-eating worm, Osedax antarcticus, collected on the Minke whale bones. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

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Humpback whale. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

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Myself (on left) and other scientists enjoying the humpback whales! Photo credit: Professor Paul Tyler.

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Humpback whale. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

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Humpback whale with barnacles. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

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Humpback whale next to the RRS James Cook stern. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

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Two Humpback whales. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

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Three Humpback whales. Photo credit: Diva Amon.

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